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高级英语第一册 14.Argentia Bay

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    (单词翻译:双击或拖选)

  14.Argentia Bay
  Herman Wouk
  1. Argemtia Bay
  Gray peace pervaded the wilderness-ringed Argentia Bay in Newfoundland, where the American ships anchored to await the arrival of Winston Churchill. Haze and mist blended all into gray: gray water, gray sky, gray air, gray hills with a tint of green. Sailors and officers went about their chores as usual on these ships, amid pipings and loud-speaker squawks. But a primeval hush lay heavy in Argentia Bay, just outside the range of the normal ships’ noises.
  At nine o'clock, three gray destroyers steamed into view, ahead of a battleship camouflaged in swirls of color like snakeskin. This was H. M. S. Prince of Wales, bigger than any other ship in sight, bearing the guns that had hit the Bismarck. As it steamed past the Augusta, a brass band on its decks shattered the hush with "The Star-Spangled Banner ” Quiet fell. The band on the quarter -deck of the Augusta struck up "God Save the King. "
  Pug Henry stood near the President, under the awning rigged at number-one turret, with admirals, generals, and august civilians like Averell Harriman and Sumner Welles Churchill was plain to see not five hundred yards away, ? an odd blue costume, gesturing with a big cigar. The president towered over everybody, stiff on braced legs, in a big brown suit, one hand holding his hat on his heart, the other clutching the arm of his son, an Air Corps Officer who strongly resembled him. Roosevelt's large pink face was self-consciously grave.
  "God Save the King" ended. The President's face relaxed. "Well! I' ve never heard 'My Country' Tis of Thee' played better." The men around him laughed politely at the presidential joke, and Roosevelt laughed too. The squeal of boatswains' pipes broke up the dress parade on the cruiser's deck.
  2. Harry Hopkins
  Admiral King beckoned to Pug. "Take my barge over to
  the Prince of Wales, and put yourself at Mr. Harry Hopkins's service. The President desires to talk with him before Churchill    comes to call, so expedite."
  "Aye aye, sir."
  Passing from the Augusta to the Prince of Wales in King's
  barge, over a few hundred yards of still water, Victor Henry went from America to England and from peace to war was a shocking jump. King's spick-and-span flagship belonged to a different world than the storm-whipped British vessel, where the accomodation ladder was salt-crusted,the camouflage paint was peeling, and even the main battery guns looked pitted and rusty. Pug was aghast to see cigarette butts and wastepaper in the scuppers, though droves of blue jackets were doing an animated scrub-down. on the superstructure raw steel patches were welded here there -- sticking plaster for wounds from the Bismarck's salvos.
  "Ah, yes, Captain Henry," said the officer of the deck, smartly returning the salute in the different British palm-out style. "Mr. Hopkins has received the signal and is waiting
  for you in his cabin. The quartermaster will escort you." Victor Henry followed the quartermaster through passage-ways quite like those in American battleships, yet different in countless details: the signs, the fittings, the fire extinguishers, the shape of the watertight doors.
  "Hello there, Pug," Hopkins spoke as though he had not seen the Navy captain for a day or two, though their last counter had been early in March, and meantime Hopkins had travelled to London and Moscow in a blaze of worldwide newspaper attention. "Am I riding over with you?"
  "Yes, sir ."
  "How's the President feeling?" Hopkins had two bags open on his bunk in a small cabin oft the wardroom. In one he carefully placed paper s, folders, and books; in the other he threw clothes, medicine bottles, and shoes as they carne to Hopkins looked thinner than before, a bent figure with a gray double-breasted suit flapping loosely on him.
  "He's having the time of his life, sir."
  "I can imagine. So's Churchill. Churchill’s like a boy going on his first date. Well, it's quite a historic moment, at that." Hopkins pulled dirty shirts from a drawer crammed them in the suitcase. "Almost forgot these. I left a few in the Kremlin and had to scrounge more in London."
  "Mr. Hopkins, what about the Russians? Will they hold?"
  Hopkins paused, a stack of papers in his hand, and pursed his mouth before speaking decisively. "The Russian will hold. But it'll be a near thing. They'll need help." He resumed his hurried packing. "When you fly from Archangel to Moscow, Pug, it takes hours and hours, over solid green forests and brown swamps. Often you don't see a village from horizon to horizon. Hitler's bitten oft a big bite this time." He was struggling with the clasps on his suitcase, and Pug gave him a hand. "Ah, thanks. What do you sup-pose Stalin wants from us most of all, Pug?"
  "Airplanes," Victor Henry said promptly. "'Clouds of airplanes. ' Same as the French were yelling for last year."
  "Aluminum," said Harry Hopkins. "Aluminum to build air-planes with. Well, let me correct that -- his number one item was
  anti-aircraft guns. Next comes aluminum. Wants a lot of Army trucks, too. Stalin isn't planning to get beaten in three weeks, or six weeks, or three years." Hopkins tidiest the paper s in the smaller case, and closed it. "Let's go
  As Hopkins shakily stepped aboard King's barge from the accomodation ladder, the stern rose high on a swell then dropped away from under him. He lost his balance and toppled into the arms of the coxswain, who said, "Oops-a-daisy,sir."
  "Pug, I'll never be a sailor," Hopkins staggered inside, setting with a sigh on the cushions. "I flopped on my face
  boarding the seaplane that flew me to the Soviet Union. That nearly ended my mission right there." He glanced
  around at the flawlessly appointed barge. "Well, well. America! Peacetime! So -- you're still in War Plans. You'll attend the staff meetings, then. "
  ."Some of them, yes, sir. "
  "You might bear in mind what our friends will be after. lt's fairly clear to me, after five days at sea with the Prime Minister." Hopkins held out one wasted hand and ticked off points on skeletal fingers. "First they'll press for an immediate declaration of war on Germany. They know they won't get that. But it softens the ground for the second demand, the real reason Winston Churchill has crossed the ocean. They want a warning by the United States to Japan that any move against the British in Asia means war with us. Their empire is mighty rickety at this point. They such a warning will shore it up. And they'll press for big war supplies to their people in Egypt and the MiddleEast. Because if Hitler pokes down there and closes the canal, the Empire strangles. They'll also try, subtly but hard--and I would too, in their place -- for an understanding that in getting American aid they come ahead of Russia. Now is the time to bomb the hell out of Germany from the West, they'll say, and build up for the final assault. Stuff We give Russia, it will be hinted, may be turned around and pointed against us in a few weeks."
  Victor Henry said, "The President isn't thinking that way."
  "I hope not. If Hitler wins in Russia, he wins the world. If he loses in Russia he's finished, even if the Japanese, move. The fight over there is of inconceivable magnitude There must be seven million men shooting at each other, Pug. Seven million, or more.” Hopkins spoke the figures slowly, stretching out the wasted fingers of both hands. "The Russians have taken a shellacking so far, but they're unafraid. They want to throw the Germans out. That's the war now. That's where the stuff should go now."
  "Then this conference is almost pointless," said Pug The barge was slowing and clanging as it drew near the Augusta. "No, it's a triumph," Hopkins said. "The President of the United States and the British Prime Minister are meeting face to face to discuss beating the Germans. That's achievement enough for now.” Hopkins gave Victor Henry a sad smile, and a brlliant light came into his large eyes. He pulled himself to his feet in the rocking boat. "Also, Pug, this is the changing of the guard."
  3. Churchill calls
  Winston Churchill came to the Augusta at eleven o'clock, which saw the dramatic handshake of Roosevelt and Churchill at the gangway. They prolonged the clasp for the photographer s, exchanging smiling words.
  In an odd way the two leaders diminished each other They were both Number One Men. But that was impossible. who, then, was Number One? Roosevelt stood a full head taller ,but he was pathetically braced on lifeless leg frames, clinging to his son's arm, his full trousers drooped and flapping. Churchill, a bent Pickwick in blue uniform, looked up at him with majestic good humor, much older, more dignified, more assured. Yet there was a trace of deference about the Prime Minister. By a shade of a shade, Roosevelt looked like Number One. Maybe that was what Hopkins had meant by "the changing of the guard. "
  The picture-taking stopped at an unseen signal, the handshake ended, and a wheelchair appear ed. The erect front page President became the cripple more familiar to Pug, hobbling a step or two and sinking with relief into the Chair. The great men and their military chiefs lett the quarterdeck.
  The staffs got right to business and conferred all day. Victor Henry worked with the planners, on the level below the chiefs of staff and their deputies where Burne-Wilke operated, and of course far below the summit of the President, the Prime Minister, and their advisers. Familiar problems came up at once: excessive and contradictory requests from the British services, unreal plans, unfilled contacts, jumbled priorities, fouled communications. One cardinal point the planners hammer ed out fast. Building new ships to replace U-boat sinkings came first. No war materiel could be used against Hitler until it had crossed the ocean. This plain truth, so simple once agreed on, ran a red line across every request, every program, every projection. Steel, aluminum, rubber, valves, motors, machine tools copper wire, all the thousand things of war, would go first to ships. This simple yardstick rapidly disclosed the poverty of the "arsenal of democracy," and dictated -- as a matter of frightening urgency -- a gigantic job of building new steel mills, and plants to turn the steel into combat machines and tools.
  Through all the talk of grand hypothetical plans -- hundreds of ships, tens of thousands of airplanes and tanks, millions of men -- one pathetic item kept recurring: an immediate need for a hundred fifty thousand rifles. If Russia collapsed, Hitler might try to wrap up the war with a Crete-like invasion of England from the air. Rifles for defending British airfields were lacking. The stupendous materiel figures for future joint invasions of North Africa or the French coast contrasted sadly with this plea for a hundred fifty thousand r if les now.
  4. Roosevelt hobbles across
  Next morning, boats from all over the sparkling bay came clustering to the Prince of Wales for church services On the surrounding hills, in sunlight that seemed almost blinding after days of gray mist, the forests of larch and fir glowed a rich green.
  An American destroyer slowly nosed its bridge along-side the battleship, exactly level with the main deck, and a gang-plank was thrown across. Leaning on his son's arm and on a cane, Franklin Roosevelt, in a blue suit and gray hat, lurched out on the gangplank, laboriously hitching one leg forward from the hip, then the other. The bay was calm, but both ships were moving on long swells. With each step, the tall President tottered and swayed. Victor Henry, like all the Americans crowding the destroyer bridge, hardly breathed as Roosevelt painfully hobbled across the narrow unsteady planks. Photographers waiting on the Prince of Wales quarter deck were staring at the President, but Pug observed that not one of them was shooting this crippled walk.
  His foot touched the deck of the Prince of Wales. Churchill saluted him and offered his hand. The brass band burst forth with "The Star Spangled Banner. " Roosevelt stood at attention, his chest heaving, his face stiff with strain. Then, escorted by Churchill, the President hitched and hobbled all the way across the deck, and sat.
  The British chaplain, his white and crimson vestments flapping in the wind, his thick gray hair blowing wildly, read the closing Royal Navy prayer: "?- Preserve us from the dangers of the sea, and from the violence of the enemy, that we may be a security for such as pass upon the sea upon their lawful occasions"- and that we may return in safety to enjoy the blessings of the land, with the fruits of our labors…and to praise and glorify Thy Holy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord…" A few British sailors cautiously moved out of ranks. One then another, sneaked cameras from their blouses. When nobody stopped them and the two leaders smiled and waved, a rush began. Cameras appeared by the dozens. The sailors swarmed into a laughing, cheering ring around the two men. Pug Henry, watching this unwonted disorder on a warship with mixed feelings of amusement and outrage, felt a touch on his elbow. It was Lord Burne Willie. "Hello there, my dear fellow. A word with you?"
  5. A request from the British
  Burne-Wilke's cabin had the dark, warm, comfortable look of a library den. "I say, Henry, what is your position on shipboard drinking? I have a fair bottle of sherry here."
  "I'm for it."
  "Good. You're dry as a bone in your service, aren't you? Yet last night the President server us an excellent wine."
  "The President is the source of all Navy regulations, sir, and can tailor them to his desires."
  "Ah? Jolly convenient." Burne-Wilke lit a cigar, and they both sipped wine. "I suppose you know that this ship crossed the ocean without escort," the air commodore resumed. "Our first night out of England, we ran into a whole gale. Our destroyer s couldn't maintain speed, so we zigzagged on alone."
  "Sir, I was appalled to hear about it."
  "Really? Rather sporting of the British Prime Minister, don’ t you think, to give the Hun a fair shot at him on the open sea. Three thousand miles without air cover or surface escort, straight through the entire submarine fleet. "
  "You had your good angels escorting you. That's all I can say.”
  "Oh, well, at any r ate her e we are. But it might be prudent not to overwork those good angels, what? Don't you agree? On our way back, every U-boat in the Atlantic will certainly be on battle alert. We shall have to run the gamut." Burne-Wilke paused, studying the ash on his cigar. "We're stretched thin for escorts, you know. We've rounded up four destroyers. Admiral Pound would be happier with six."
  Victor Henry quickly said, "I'll talk to Admiral King.”
  "You understand that this cannot be a request from us. The Prime Minister would be downright annoyed. He's hoping we'll meet the Tirpitz and get into a running gun fight."
  "Let me star t on this now, sir ." Pug drank up his sherry, and rose to his feet.
  "Oh? Would you?" Burne-Wilke opened the cabin door. "Thanks awfully."
  On the after deck, the photographing was still going on. Officers with cameras were now shouldering sailors aside, as the two politicians cheerfully chatted. Behind them stood their glum chiefs of staff and civilian advisers. Hopkins, squinting out at the sunny water, wore a pained expression. The military men were talking together, except for Admiral King, who stood woodenly apart. Pug walked up to him, saluted, and in the fewest possible words recount-ed his talk with Burne-Wilke. The lines along King's lean Jaws deepened. He nodded twice and strolled away, without a word. He did not go anywhere. It was just a gesture of dismissal, and a convincing one.
  Amid much wining and dining, the conference went on for two more days. One night Churchill took the floor in the Augusta wardroom after dinner, and delivered a rolling, rich word picture of how the war would go. Blockade, ever growing air bombardment, and subversion would in time weaken the grip of Nazi claws on Europe. Russia and England would "close a ring" and slowly, inexorably tighten it, If the United States became a full-fledged ally, it would all go much faster, of course. No big invasion or long land campaign would be needed in the West. Landing of a few armored columns in the occupied countries would bring mass uprisings. Hitler's black empire would suddenly collapse in rubble, blood, and flame. Franklin Roosevelt listened with bright-eyed smiling attention, saying nothing, and applauding heartily with the rest.
  On the last day of the conference, just before lunch, Admiral King sent for Pug. He found the admiral in under-shirt and trousers in his cabin, drying face and ears with a towel. "Task Unit 26 point 3 point 1, consisting of two destroyers, the Mayrant and the Rhind, has bee formed," King said without a greeting. "It will escort the Prince of Wales to Iceland. You will embark in the Prince of Wales as liaison officer, disembark in Iceland, and return with our task unit."
  "Aye aye, sir."
  "You'll have no written orders. In confidence, we'll soon be convoying all ships to Iceland. Maybe by next week. Hell, our own marines are occupying the place now. The President's even sending a young officer along as a naval aide to Churchill while he tours our Iceland base. Ensign
  Franklin D. Roosevelt, Junior."King spoke the name with an expressionless face.
  "Yes, sir ."
  "Now, Henry, how are you at languages?"
  "It's long time since I tried a new one, Admiral."
  "Well, a military supply mission will go to the Soviet Union in September. If Russia's still in the war by then, that is, Mr. Hopkins has brought up your name. He appears impressed, and the President too, by your expertise on landing craft and so forth. Now your service record has been checked, and it seems you claim a 'poor to fair ’ knowledge of Russian. Hey? How is that? That's very unusual."
  "Admiral, I put that down when I enter ed the Academy in 1911. It was true then. I don't remember ten words now." Henry explained the circumstances that had given him : Russian-speaking chums in his Sonoma County boyhood.
  "I see. Well, it's there on the record. Upon returning from Iceland you will be detached from War Plans to pre-pare yourself, with an intensive refresher course in Russian, for a possible trip to the Soviet Union on special detached duty. You'll have interpreters. But with even a smattering, your intelligence value will be greater."
  "Aye, aye, sir ."
  King put on his uniform jacket, stared at Victor Henry, and for the first time that Henry could recall, favored him With a smile.
  "Have you heard that extension of the draft passed the House of Representatives an hour ago?"
  "It did? Thank God."
  "By one vote."
  "What! One vote, sir?"
  "One vote."
  "Whew! That's not going to encourage the British, Admiral."
  "No, nor the President, but it's how the American people feel right now. It may be suicidal, but there it is. Our job is to keep going anyway."
  6. U-boat sightings
  To brass band anthems and booming gun salutes, in a brisk breeze smelling of green hills and gunpowder, the Prince of Wales left Argentia Bay. The great conference was over.
  In the wardroom of the Prince of Wales, Victor Henry could sense the subtle gloom hanging over the ship. What the conference had accomplished to increase help for Eng-land remained undisclosed; and in itself this clearly struck the battleship's officers as a bad sign. These men, veterans of two combat year s, of air attacks and gun fights, had a subdued dismal air, despite the grandeur of their ship and the stuffy luxury of their wardroom . The predicament of England seemed soaked in their bones. They could not Believe that Winston Churchill had risked the best ship in their strained navy, and his own life, only to return empty-handed. That wasn't Winnie's style. But vague hope, rather than real confidence, was the note in their conversation
  Major-General Tillet came up to Victor Henry after dinner that evening, and laid a lean hand on his shoulder."Like to have a look at the submarine sightings chart, Henry? The prime Minister thought you might."
  Red secrecy warnings blazed on the steel door that Tillet opened. Dressed in a one-piece garment like a mechanic's coveralls, stooped and heavy-eyed, Churchill pondered a map of the Russian front all across one bulkhead. Opposite hung a chart of the Atlantic. Young officers worked over dispatches at a table in the middle of the
  room, in air thick with tobacco smoke.
  "There," said the Prime Minister to Tillet and Pug Henry, gesturing at the map of the Soviet Union with his cigar." There is an awful unfolding picture."
  The crimson line of the front east of Smolensk showed two fresh bulges toward Moscow. Churchill coughed, and glanced at Henry. "Your President warned Stalin. I warned him even more explicitly, basing myself on very exact intelligence. Surely no government ever had less excuse to be surprised." The Prime Minister turned and walked to the other bulkhead, with a tottering step. At Argentia,.Churchill had appeared strong, rubby, springy, and altogether ten year s younger. Now his cheeks were ashy, with red patches.
  "Hello. Don't we have a development here?"
  Little black coffin-shaped markers dotted the wide blue spaces, and an officer was putting up several more, in a cluster close to the battleship's projected course. Far ther son stood large clusters of r ed pins, with a few blue pins. "This new U-boat group was sighted by an American patrol plane at twilight, sir, "said the officer.
  "Ah, yes. So Admiral Pound advised me. I suppose we are evading?"
  "We have altered course to north, sir."
  "Convoy H-67 is almost home, I see."
  "We will be pulling those pins tonight, Mr. Prime Minister."
  "That will be happy news." Churchill harshly coughed, puffing at his cigar, and said to Pug Henry, "Well. We may have some sport for you yet. It won't be as lively as a bomber r ice over Berlin. Eh? Did you enjoy that, Captain?"
  "It was a rare privilege, Mr. Prime Minister."
  "Any time. Any time at all."
  "Too much honor, sir. Once was plenty."
  Churchill uttered a hoarse chuckle. "I daresay. What is the film tonight, General Tillet?"
  "Prime Minister, I believe it is Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, in Saps at Sea."
  "Saps at sea, eh? Not inappropriate! The Surgeon-General has ordered me to remain in bed. He has also ordered me not to smoke. I shall attend Saps at Sea, and bring my cigars. "
  Pug Henry's enjoyment of Saps at Sea was shadowed by an awareness that at any moment the battleship might re into a U-boat pack. Greman skippers were adept at sneaking past destroyer screens. But the film spun to the end uninterrupted. "A gay but inconsequent entertainment, " the Prime Minister remarked in a heavy, rheumy voice, as he plodded out.
  7. "We'll have to pay the price"
  Clement Attlee's broadcast the next day packed the wardroom. Every officer not on watch, and all staff officers and war planners, gathered in the wardroom around one singularly ancient, crack-voiced radio. The battleship, plowing through a wild storm, rolled and pitched with slow long groans. For the American guest, it was a bad half hour. He saw perplexed looks, lengthening faces, and head-shakes, as Attlee read oft the "Atlantic Charter." The high-flown language bespoke not a shred of increased American commitment. Abuse of Nazi tyranny, praise of "four freedoms, "dedication to a future of world peace and brotherhood, yes; more combat help for the British, flat zero. Some sentences about free trade and independence for all peoples meant the end of the British Empire, if they meant anything.
  Franklin Roosevelt was indeed a tough customer, thought Captain Henry, not especially surprised.
  "Umph!" grunted Major-General Tillet in the silence after the radio was shut off. "I'd venture there was more to it than that. How about it, Henry?"
  All eyes turned on the American.
  Pug saw no virtue in equivocating. "No, sir, I'd guess that was it."
  "Your President has now pledged in a joint communique to destroy Nazi tyranny," Tillet said. "Doesn't that mean You'er coming in, one way or another?"
  "It means Lend-Lease,” Pug said.
  Questions shot at him from all sides.
  "You're not going to stand with us against Japan?"
  "Not now."
  "But isn't the Pacific your fight, pure and simple?"
  "The President won't give a war warning to Japan. He can't, without Congress behind him."
  "What's the matter with your Congress?"
  "That's a good question, but day before yesterday it came within one vote of practically dissolving the United States Army."
  "Don't the congressmen know what’ s happening in the world?"
  "They vote their political hunches to protect their political hides. "
  "Then what's the matter with your people?"
  "Our people are about where yours were at the time of the Munich pact. "
  That caused a silence.
  Tillet said, "We're paying the price."
  "We' ll have to pay the price. "
  "We had Chamberlain then for a leader, sir," said a fresh-faced lieutenant."You have Roosevelt."
  "The American people don't want to fight Hitler, gentlemen, ” said Pug. "It's that simple, and Roosevelt can't help that. They don't want to fight anybody. Life is pleasant. The war's a ball I game they can watch. You're the home team, because you talk our language. Hence Lend-Lease, and this Atlantic Charter. Lend-Lease is no sweat,
  it just means more jobs and money for everybody.”
  An unusually steep roll brought a crash of crockery in the galley. The crossfire stopped. Victor Henry went to his cabin. Before disembarking in Iceland, he did not talk much more to the British officers.
  (from The Winds of War, 1971)

  第十四课阿真舍湾 (节选)
  赫尔曼?沃克
  一、阿真舍湾
  一片灰色的宁静笼罩着蛮荒环布的纽芬兰阿真舍湾,那些美国军舰就停泊在这里静候着温斯顿?丘吉尔的到来。轻烟薄雾将一切都染成了灰色:灰色的海水,灰色的天空,灰色的空气,还有那略带着一点绿意的灰色的山丘。在尖厉的哨声和扩音喇叭声中,那些军舰上的水兵和军官们如往常一样在执行着各自的军务。在军舰上那些日常的喧闹声所及的范围之外,便是那笼罩着阿真舍湾的一片原始蛮荒的静寂。
  九点钟,三艘灰色的驱逐舰驶入了视线,后面跟着出现一艘涂着蛇皮般迷彩伪装色的战列舰,那便是英国皇家海军的"威尔士亲王号",也是在场的最大军舰,舰上装备着的大炮曾经击中德舰"俾斯麦号"。当它驶过"奥古斯特号"时,甲板上的军乐队打破寂静,奏响了美国国歌《星条旗》。此曲一终,"奥古斯特号,,的后甲板上的军乐队接着奏起了英国国歌《上帝保佑吾王》。
  在一号炮塔上临时支起的帆布凉篷下面,帕格.亨利同海陆军将领们以及艾弗里尔?哈里曼和萨姆纳?韦尔斯等显要文职官员们一起站在总统的身边。他们可以清楚地看到距离不到五百码远的丘吉尔,他穿着一身式样古怪的蓝色衣服,手中挥动着一根大亨茄。身材比所有的人都高大得多的总统则穿着一套正正规规的大号棕色西装,撑在装着支架的病腿上僵直地站着,一只手拿着礼帽故于胸前,另一只手抓着儿子的胳膊。他的儿子是海军航空队的一位军官,面貌同他极为相像。罗斯福那粉红色的大脸上有意识地露m一副庄重严肃的表情。《上帝保佑吾王》演奏既毕,总统的表情轻松起来。"唷!我还从来没有听到过演奏得比这更好的《我的祖国,这是您》。"周围的人对总统的这句玩笑报以礼貌的微笑,罗斯福本人也笑了起来?随着水手长吹出的一声尖厉的哨音,巡洋舰甲板上的这场检阅活动结束了。
  二、哈利?霍普金斯
  海军上将金招呼帕格。"坐我的快艇到'威尔士亲王号'上去给哈利.霍普金斯先生送个信。总统希望在丘吉尔来访之前同他先谈谈,因此,请赶快去办。"
  "是,长官。"
  维克多.亨利坐着金的快艇,驶过几百码平静的水面,从"奥古斯特号"来到"威尔士亲王号"。他实际上是从美国来到了英国,从和平跨进了战争。这是一个惊人的跳跃。金的那艘整洁漂亮的旗竖和眼前这艘饱经风霜的英国军舰完全属于两个不同的世界。这艘英国军舰上,舷梯已被海水侵蚀,伪装油漆都已剥落,甚至连几门主炮上都是锈迹斑斑,弹痕累累。使帕格尤为惊奇的是,尽管有许多水手正在那儿起劲地擦洗军舰,船舷上的排水扎里捌基硼J烟蒂和废纸。甲板以上的舰身部分则到处焊补着粗糙的钢板片--这是让"俾斯麦号"排炮击伤的部位贴上的橡皮膏
  "啊,是的,亨利上校,"甲板上的值班军官潇洒地向亨利回敬了一个掌心向外的英式军礼。"霍普金斯先生已接到信号,此时正存他的舱房里等您。让军需官陪您去。"'。维克多.亨利跟着军需官走过一条条走廊,这些走廊与美国军舰上的走廊差不多一个样,但也有许多细微的差别,如一些标记符号、灯具、灭火器、密封防水门的形状等。
  "你好,帕格,"霍普金斯说话的语气仿佛同这位海军上校才一两天未见面似的,而实际上他们上一次见面已经是三月初的事情了。那以后,霍普金斯前往伦敦和莫斯科,成了世界各大报纸大为关注的新闻人物。
  "是要我同你一道过去吗?"
  "是的,先生。"
  "总统情绪怎样?"霍普金斯在他那间紧挨着军官室的小卧舱的床铺上打开了两个提包。他往其中的一个里小心冀翼地放进一些文件和书册,另一个里则随手胡乱塞进一些衣服、鞋子和药瓶子。霍普金斯看样子比以前瘦了很多,背也驼了,一件灰色双排钮扣的西装套在身上显得空荡荡的。
  "他情绪好极了,先生。"
  "我想象得出。丘吉尔也是这样。丘吉尔这几天就像一个将要初次约会的小伙子。说起来,这的确是一个历史性的时刻。"霍普金斯从一个抽屉中拽出几件脏兮兮的衬衣,信手塞进手提箱里。"差点忘了这几件衬衣。我在克里姆林宫就已经丢了几件,到伦敦后不得不再弄了几件。"
  "霍普金斯先生,俄国人方面的情形如何?他们能坚持下去吗?"
  霍普金斯没立即回答。他手里拿着一叠文件,撇了撇嘴,然后以十分肯定的口气说:"俄国人能够坚持下去,但形势还是很危急。他们需要支援。"他又忙着收拾东西。"帕格,如果你从阿尔汉格尔斯克飞到莫斯科,途中要飞行好几个小时,飞过一片片郁郁葱葱的茂密的森林和褐色的沼泽。有时候你放眼望去,望到天边也看不见一个村庄的影子。希特勒这一口咬得可真大。"他拼命使劲想扣上手提箱上的搭扣,帕格忙上前帮了他一把。"啊,谢谢。帕格,你猜猜看,斯大林最希望我们向他提供什么?"
  "飞机,"维克多?亨利不假思索地说。"'遮天蔽日的飞机'就像去年法国人大喊大叫着要的那样。" "是铝,"哈利?霍普金斯说。"用来制造飞机的铝。唔,让我来纠正一下吧--他最想得到的是高射炮,其次才是铝,另外还想要大批军用卡车。斯大林没打算在三个星期,或六个星期,或三年内就让人打败。"霍普金斯将一些文件整理收拾好了,放在小手提箱里,然后关好。"我们走吧。"
  霍普金斯刚刚颤巍巍地顺着舷梯爬到金的快艇的甲板上,还没站稳,艇尾突地一下子被浪尖揄赢,接着又跌落下去。霍普金斯失去平衡,身子一歪,倒在了艇长的怀里。艇长赶忙用儿语安慰说,"别害怕,先生。"
  "帕格,我永远也当不了一名水手,"霍普金斯踉踉跄跄地走进舱室,叹了口气,在软垫上坐下。"登水上飞机去苏联的时候,我竞扑面倒地,差一点当场就结束了我的使命。"他环顾了一下这艘设备完善的快艇。"好了,好了。美国!和平时代!这么说--你还在作战部。那么,参谋会议你是要参加的了。"
  "有些会议是要参加的,先生。"
  "你应该记住我们的朋友们的要求。同首相一起在海上度过五天之后,我对这一点是很清楚的。''霍普金斯伸出一只瘦削的手,扳着瘦骨嶙峋的手指头说了起来。"首先他们会敦促我们立即对德国宣战。他们明白这个目的是达不到的,但它会为第二个要求铺平道路,那才是温斯顿.丘吉尔横渡大洋的真正原因。他们希望由美国向日本提出警告:在亚洲采取任何与英国作对的行动都意味着I司我们开战。他们的帝国在亚洲的力量很薄弱,希望美国对这种警告起一些支持的作用。他们还将催促我们向他们在埃及和中东的军队提供大量军用物资。因为如果希特勒侵入该地区,封锁苏伊士运河的话,大英帝国便等于被人扼住了咽喉,势必难以生存下去。他们还会巧妙而又努力地设法一一我若处在他们的地位也会那样做一一达成这样一种谅解,即在获取美国援助方面他们应该优先于俄国。他们会说,现在是从西线开火把德国炸个天翻地覆的时候了,应该积蓄力量,准备发起最后攻击。他们还会暗示,我们给俄国人提供的物资,几个星期之后也许就会诩过头来用。二攻击我们。"
  维克多.亨利说,"总统可不这样认为。"
  "但愿如此。一旦希特勒战胜了俄国,他就会战胜全世界;而如果他在俄国战败,他就会彻底完蛋,即使日本人有什么动作也无关大局。俄国那边的战斗规模之大简直令人难以想象。战斗双方投入的兵员估计有七百万。帕格,七百万,也许还更多。"霍普金斯一字一顿地说出这个数字,同时把两只手的瘦削的手指全伸了出来。"到目前为止,俄国人一直处于挨打的地位,但他们并不害怕。他们决心要将德国人赶出去。目前的战场就在那儿,援助物资也应该运送到那儿去。"
  "那样说,这次会谈几乎毫无意义了,"帕格说。快艇此时已放慢速度,轧轧响着靠近了"奥古斯特号"。
  "不,这次会谈是一次胜利,"霍普金斯说。"美国总统和英国首相走到一起,面对面地商讨打败德国人的问题。就目前来说,这件事本身就是一个伟大的胜利。"霍普金斯对帕格.亨利忧郁地笑了笑,大大的眼睛中随即闪现出喜悦的光芒。他在摇摇晃晃的快艇上站起身来。"再说,帕格,这是一次有历史意义的换岗啊!"
  三、丘吉尔来访
  温斯顿?丘吉尔十一点钟来到"奥古斯特号"上,罗斯福在舷梯口I司丘吉尔那戏剧性的握手因让摄影师照相而延长了时间,他们微笑着互致问候。
  这两位领导人以一种奇特的方式贬抑对方。他们两位都是头号人物,但这又是不可能的,两个人不可能同时都是第一。那么,究竟谁是第一呢?罗斯福站着比丘吉尔高出一个头,然而他却是可怜地由两根没有生命的假腿支撑着,紧依在儿子的胳膊上,长裤空荡荡地迎风飘动着。丘吉尔呢,看起来像一个穿着蓝制服的驼背的匹克威克,他抬头看着罗斯福,神态庄重而又亲切。比起罗斯福来,他老成一些,神态更威严,也更自信。不过,从这位首相身上还是可以看出一些钦佩罗斯福的神色来。罗斯福看起来有那么一丁点儿更像第一号人物。或许这就是霍普金斯所说的"换岗,,的意思吧。
  一个看不见的信号使摄影工作停止了,两人之间的握手结束了,接着就见一辆轮椅推了出来。很快,那位在报纸头版的新闻图片上昂然挺立的总统又成了帕格更为熟悉的瘸子;他蹒跚着走了一两步,就一屁股跌进轮椅,并长长地舒了一口气。两位伟人和他们手下的军事首脑们都离开了后甲板。
  参谋人员立即开始工作,全天开会。维克多.亨利与作战计划人员一起开会,勃纳?沃克就参加这一层的会议,级别上低于参谋282长们及其副手们,当然比总统、首相及其顾问.的最高级会议低得多。一开始就碰到了熟悉的老问题:来自英国军方的要求太过分,又互相矛盾,计划不现实,合同没兑现,须优先照顾的顺序一团糟,通讯联络混乱不清。计划人员很快就确定了重点,那就是首先要制造新船以补充被德国潜艇击沉的船只。战争物资如不运到大洋彼岸,就无法用来跟希特勒作战。这是明摆着的事实,一旦意见一致,所有其他的要求、方案和计划就得一笔勾销。钢铁、铝材、橡胶、阀门、马达、机床、铜线,所有这成千种战争物资要首先用于造船。这个简单的衡量标尺很快就暴露出"民主(阵营)兵工厂"的贫困并提出必须着手进行一项巨大的、迫在眉睫的工作:建造新的钢厂和将钢材制成作战车辆和武器的工厂。
  各种各样设想中的宏伟计划涉及数以百计的舰船,成千上万的飞机和坦克,成百万的兵员。在讨论所有这一切的过程中,一个忧郁的话题反复出现:急需十五万支步枪。假如俄国崩溃,希特勒很可能会像入侵克里特岛一样对英国发动一场大规模空中入侵以结束战争,而用来保卫英国机场的步枪却不够数。与将来联军对北非或者法国海岸发起联合进攻所需的庞大数量的战争物资相比,眼下这十五万支步枪的需求实在少得可怜。
  四、罗斯福蹒跚着登上英舰
  第二天上午,一艘艘轻舟快艇越过波光粼粼的海湾,从四面八方云集到"威尔士亲王号"周围做礼拜。经过连日的灰蒙蒙的大雾之后,阳光显得格外明媚耀眼,使得周围山丘上那一片片松树林和枞树林也显得格外的郁郁葱葱。
  一艘美国驱逐舰徐徐地向前靠拢,舰桥正对着这艘战列舰的主甲板,然后一块跳板搭了过来。弗兰克林?罗斯福身穿一套蓝色西服,头戴一顶灰色礼帽,手拄一根拐杖,在儿子的搀扶下步履蹒跚地踏上跳板,吃力地拖着一条腿向前移动一步,然后再拖另一条腿移动。海湾里风平浪静,但两艘军舰仍随着平缓的波浪摇晃颠簸。身材高大的总统每前跨一步,身子都会左摇右晃、前跌后仰。维克多?亨利和挤在驱逐舰舰桥上的所有美国人一样,屏息静气地注视着罗斯福步履艰难地蹒跚走过那狭窄而又摇晃不停的跳板。等候在"威尔士亲王号"的甲板上的摄影记者们也都在目不转睛地看着总统,但帕格注意到,谁也没有拍摄罗斯福蹒跚而行的镜头。
  他的脚终于踏上了"威尔士亲王号"的甲板,丘吉尔向他敬礼并伸出手来扶他。铜管乐队奏起了《星条旗》,罗斯福立正站着,胸脯一起一伏地喘着粗气,脸上显出严肃的神色。乐曲奏完后,总统在丘吉尔的陪同下,一瘸一拐地走过甲板,坐了下来。
  英国牧师身上穿着的红白两色的法衣在海风吹拂下不停地飘摆着,满头浓密的灰发狂飞乱舞。此时他正念诵着英国皇家海军祈祷词的最末一段:"……从海上的危险中拯救我们,从敌寇的强暴下拯救我们;愿我们正当的海上航行安全得到保障……让我们满载自己的劳动成果,平安返乡,满怀喜悦地投入大地的怀抱……以赞美和显耀您神圣的名字;以我主耶稣基督……"
  几名英国水兵小心翼翼地走出队列,先是一个人,接着其余的人一个接一个地偷偷从怀里摸出照相机来。看到无人阻拦他们,而两位领导人还满面笑容地挥手向他们致意,水兵们便一齐拥了过来。照相机一下子出现了几十架。水手们欢笑着将两位大人物团团围住。看到军舰上出现这种异乎寻常的混乱局面,帕格?亨利觉得又好笑又好气。就在这时,他觉得有人碰了他胳膊肘一下,原来是勃纳?沃克勋爵。"你好哇,亲爱的朋友,同你说句话好吗?"
  五、英国人的一项请求
  勃纳?沃克的卧舱像一间私人藏书室一样光线柔和,温暖而舒适。"喂,亨利,你觉得在军舰上喝酒怎么样?我这儿差不多有一满瓶雪利酒。"
  "我赞成。"
  "太好了。在执行任务期间完全不能喝酒,对不对?可昨天晚上总统却请我们喝了一顿美酒。"
  "海军的一切条令本来就是总统制定的,先生,他也有权根据自己的需要修改这些条令。"
  "噢?那倒很方便。"勃纳?沃克点燃一支雪茄,接着两个人便呷起酒来。"我猜你一定知道这艘军舰是在没有护航的条件下横渡大洋的吧。"这位空军准将接着说道,"我们从英国出发后的第一天晚
  上就遇上了大风暴,为我们护航的驱逐舰没法保持速度,所以我们只好单独地走曲线绕行了。"
  "先生,这话可真使我大吃了一惊。"
  "是吗?你是否觉得英国首相过于冒险了一些,有意让德国鬼子在大海上将他当靶子打?我们可是在既没有空中掩护也没有海面护航的条件下,穿过整整一个德国潜艇舰队的伏击区,航行三千英里呀。"
  "我只能说你们有你们的善良的天使在护佑你们。"
  "哦,是啊,不管怎么说,我们已平安到达这儿了。不过,还是谨慎一些,不要让那些善良的天使过分操劳的好,你说呢?你难道不这么看吗?在我们返航途中,大西洋上的每一艘德国潜艇一定都已作好了战斗准备。我们不得不穿过他们的伏击区。"说到这里,勃纳.沃克停顿下来,凝神注视着雪茄上的烟灰。"你知道,我们的护航力量很单薄。我们集中了四艘驱逐舰。要是能有六艘,海军上将庞德一定会更高兴的。"
  维克多.亨利马上接口说,"我会同海军上将金谈一谈的。"
  "  你明白,这事我们不能提出要求。首相若是知道了,一定会发火的。他正期望着与德舰"蒂尔皮茨号"遭遇,来一场激烈的炮战哩。"
  "我马上就去办理这件事吧,先生。"帕格一口把酒喝干,站起身来。
  "哦?就要去了吗?"勃纳?沃克打开舱门。"那真是太感谢了。"
  后甲板上,照相还在进行。两位政治家还在愉快地交谈,而那些水兵们这时已被一些带照相机的军官们挤开了。两位政治家背后站着的那些高级参谋人员和文职顾问们个个都是满脸不高兴的样子。霍普金斯眼睛斜视着阳光普照的海面,一副愁眉苦脸的样子。军官们都聚在一堆交谈,只有海军上将金神情木然地独立站在一旁。帕格走上前去,敬了个礼,然后尽量简明扼要地汇报了他同勃纳.沃克的谈话情况。金的瘦削的下巴上的皱纹加深了。他点了两下头,一言不发地走开了。他并不是要走到哪里去,他的那种动作只是为了示意让亨利离开,而且是一种坚决有力的表不。
  会议接下来又继续开了两天,其问举行了多次酒宴。一天晚上,晚宴过后,丘吉尔在"奥古斯特号"的军官室里演讲,滔滔不绝地发表了一篇内容丰富多彩的演说,描绘了这场战争的发展趋势。封锁、越来越猛烈的空袭和扰敌破坏活动迟早将削弱控制着欧洲的纳粹魔爪,俄国和英国将会"形成一个包围圈",并将慢慢地无情地缩紧这个包围圈。如果美国成为一个全力以赴的盟国,战局的进展当然会快得多。西部战场不需要进行大规模进攻或长时间的陆战。只需几个装甲纵队在被占领国家一登陆,便会导致群众起义,希特勒的黑色帝国便会在一片瓦砾、鲜血和烈火中土崩瓦解。富兰克林。罗斯福面带微笑,瞪大眼睛,聚精会神地听着,不插一句话,只是由衷地同其他的人一道热烈地鼓掌喝彩。
  会议的最后一天,就在午餐开始之前,海军上将金派人来叫帕格。帖格来到金的舱室,看到这位海军上将身穿衬衣和裤子,正在用毛巾擦洗面部和耳朵。"特混舰队26.3.1.包括'梅伦号,和t梭德号'两艘驱逐舰,已经组成,"金连招呼也没有打就开口说道。"这支舰队将护送'威尔士亲王号'去冰岛。你将以联络官的身分登上t威尔士亲王号',到冰岛后再离开'威尔士亲王号,,随特混舰队返回。"
  "是,长官。"
  "不给你下书面命令了。私下里先给你透个风,我们很快就会将所有船舰护航到冰岛,时间可能就在下周。见鬼,我们的海军陆战队已经占领那个地方了。总统甚至还派了一位年轻军官作为海军副官陪同丘吉尔参观我们的冰岛基地,此人是海军少尉小富兰克林'罗斯福。"提到这个名字时,金的脸上没有任何表情。
  "知道了,长官。"
  "再问你一句,亨利,你在语言方面怎么样?"
  "很久以前我学过一种外语,将军。"
  "是这样的,九月份要运送军用物资去苏联,当然就是说,如果俄国到时仍在坚持战斗的话。霍普金斯先生提名要你去,他和总统似乎都很欣赏你在登陆运载工具等方面的专长。我们还查过你的服役档案,好像你自称懂一点俄语。嘿!是怎么回事?这可不简单哪。" "将军,那是我一九一一年进海军学院时登记填写的,当时的确懂一点俄语,可现在连十个单词也记不得了。"亨利接着说明了童年时代在索诺玛郡有机会交上说俄语的伙伴的情况。
  "我知道了。不过,档案上就是这么填的。待你从冰岛返回后,就将你从作战计划处调出来,进强化班温习一下俄语,做好准争,以便于需要时去苏联执行一桩特殊使命。到时会给你配翻译的。但是,你自己哪怕是只懂一点点俄语,那也会使你的情报更有价值。
  "是,是,长官。"
  金穿上制服上衣,定睛看着维克多?亨利,微微地笑了笑。这可是亨利记忆中第一次得到这样的恩赐。
  "延长征兵制法案一小时前在众议院获得通过,你听说过了吗?"
  "通过了?感谢上帝!"
  "以一票的微弱多数。"
  "什么?一票,长官?"
  "一票。"
  "唷!这可不能鼓舞英国人,将军。"
  "是啊,也鼓舞不了总统,可时下美国人民就是这样的态度。这可能是自取灭亡,但事实就是如此。无论如何,我们的工作要继续'干下去。"
  六、德国潜艇布局图
  随着两国国歌的奏响和礼炮的轰鸣,迎着那散发出青山的气息和硝烟气味的清新的微风,"威尔士亲王号"驶离了阿真舍湾。这次伟大的会议结束了。
  在"威尔士亲王号"的军官室里,维克多?亨利可以感觉出笼罩着全舰的那种阴郁的气氛。这次会议在增加对英国的援助方面罂得了一些什么样的进展,尚未公布出来;而这事本身显然使舰上的军官们感觉到是个不好的兆头。这些人都是在空袭和炮战中浴粤奋战了两年的老兵;尽管他们的军舰是那么富丽堂皇,他们的军官;又那么豪华气派,他们的情绪却很压抑。英国的困境似乎渗进了他们的骨髓。他们无法相信,温斯顿?丘吉尔为了这次会议把他们那已经元气大伤的海军中最好的一艘军舰,连同他自己的生命都拿来冒险,到头来竟会空手而归。这可不是温尼的风格。然而,他们谈话的调子都很悲观,只有渺茫的希望,而没有真正的信心。
  这天晚饭过后,梯莱特少将走到维克多?亨利身边,将一只瘦削的手按住他的肩头。"想看看潜艇布局图吗,亨利?首相认为你有可能想看看。"
  梯莱特打开的那扇钢舱门上亮着红色保密信号灯。丘吉尔身穿一件像机械师工作服式样的连衣裤,弓着背,垂着眼皮,正在察看一幅占了一面舱壁的俄国前线地图。正对面的舱壁上挂着一幅大西洋海图。舱室里烟雾腾腾,几位年轻军官正在屋中央的一张桌子上处理电讯收发工作。
  "那儿,"首相用手中的雪茄指了指那幅苏联地图,对梯莱特和帕格'亨利说,"那儿是一幅正在展开的可怕的画卷。"
  标志斯摩棱斯克东部前线的那条红线上出现了两道新画出的指向莫斯科的粗线。丘吉尔咳嗽了一声,目光扫向亨利。"你们的总统曾经警告过斯大林,我自己根据确切的情报对他提出了更加明确的警告。别的国家受到袭击时猝不及防还情有可原,苏联政府仓猝无备就太说不过去了。"首相转过身,拖着疲乏的脚步走向对面的舱壁。在阿真舍湾时,丘吉尔显得身健体壮,气色很好,充满活力,简直年轻了十岁。此时的钞却冀舰发灰,布满红斑。
  "哈罗,我们在这儿有什么新发现吗?"
  一个个黑色的小棺材形状的标记散布在宽广的蓝色平面上,一位军官还在往上加几个,在靠近战列舰预定的航道附近密布着一群。再往前,是一大群一大群的红头针,其中也夹着一些蓝头针。
  "这个新潜艇群是黎明时分一架美国侦察机发现的,长官,"那位军官说。
  "啊,是的。庞德上将也是这样告诉我的。我猜想我们是在避开它们?"
  "我们的航向已经改往北方,长官。"
  "H一67护航舰已差不多到家了,我知道。"
  "今晚我们就把这些针拔掉,首相先生。"
  "这倒是好消息,"丘吉尔粗声地咳嗽着,一面抽雪茄,一面列亨利说,"看来,我们还会有点好戏给你看的。不过它不会有乘轰炸机飞临柏林上空那么热闹,对吗?那回玩得开心吧,上校?"
  "那是一次难得的殊荣,首相先生。"
  "随时可得,随时可得。"
  "太荣幸了,先生。一次就足够了。"
  丘吉尔哑着声音咯咯笑了起来。"我想也是。今晚是什么电影,梯莱特将军?"
  "首相,我想是斯坦?劳莱和奥利佛?哈代合演的《海上笨蛋》。"
  "《海上笨蛋》吗?倒是挺合适的!军医命令我卧床休息,还命令我别抽烟。我要去看《海上笨蛋》,还要带上我的雪茄。"
  帕格?亨利观看《海J二笨蛋》时并没有心思去好好欣赏,因为他心里老想着这艘战列舰不知什么时候就会碰上一群德国潜艇。那些德国艇长很有本领,常常会溜过驱逐舰保护网。但是,直到电影放完,也没有发生任何事件。"虽开心热闹却有点牵强附会。"首相一边拖着沉重的脚步往外走,一边用低沉、浑浊的声音这样评论道。
  七、"我们终不免要付出代价"
  次日,军舰上的军官起居室挤满了听克莱门特?艾德礼广播讲话的人。所有不值班的军官,全体参谋人员和制订作战计划的人员都聚集在军官室里唯一的一台特别陈旧的、格格作响的收音机周围。战舰正在狂风暴雨中破浪前进,摇晃颠簸,发出缓慢冗长的嘎吱声。对他这位美国客人来说,这半小时非常难熬。
  在艾德礼逐段宣读"大西洋宪章"时,他看到困惑的目光,拉长了的面孔,和频频的摇头。夸张的语言一点也没有表明美国同意承担更大的义务。口口声声都是对纳粹暴政的谴责,对"四大自由"的赞扬,对充满和平和兄弟情谊的未来世界的献身,就是只字不提对英国更多的军事援助。某些关于贸易自由和各民族独立的词句,如果有什么具体含义的话,那就是意味着大英帝国的末日。
  对此,帕格并不特别惊讶,他只是想:弗兰克林?罗斯福可真是个难对付的家伙。
  "哼!"在收音机关掉后的一片沉默中,梯莱特少将咕哝着说,"我敢说会议结果一定不止于此。你说呢,亨利?"
  所有的目光都转向这位美国人。
  帕格明白无法含糊过去,只好说,"不,先生,恐怕就只这些了。"
  "你们的总统现在已经在联合公报中承诺要消灭纳粹暴政,"梯莱特说,"这是否意味着,你们不论用什么方式,终究是要参战的?"
  "那是指的《租借法案》,"帕格说。
  各种各样的问题从四面八方向他投射过来。
  "你们不准备同我们联手对付日本吗?"
  "目前尚无此打算。"
  "那么,简单明了地说,你们是不打算参加太平洋战争了?"
  "总统不会向日本提出战争警告。没有国会的支持,他不能这样做。"
  "你们的国会是怎么回事?"
  "这个问题问得好。可就在前天,我们的国会差一点就要解散美国军队,仅仅只差了一票啊。"
  "难道你们的国会议员们对世界局势一点也不了解吗?"
  "他们根据自己的政治利益投票,以期保住其政治地位。"
  "那么,你们的人民又是怎么回事呢?"
  "我们的人民目前的态度和贵国人民在慕尼黑协定时的态度差不多。"
  这话带来了一阵沉默。
  梯莱特说,"我们正在为此付出代价。"
  "我们也终将会付出代价的。"
  "那时候我们的领头人是张伯伦,先生,"一位面色红润的上尉说。"而你们现在的领头人是罗斯福。"
  "美国人民不想同希特勒打仗,先生们,"帕格说。"事情就这么简单,对此罗斯福也无计可施。他们不想同任何人打仗。生活是美好的,战争是一场他们可以袖手旁观的球赛。你们等于是我们自己一方的球队,因为你们和我们说着同样的语言。所以,才有了《租借法案》和这个《大西洋宪章》。《租借法案》并不是什么吃亏的事儿,它在大伙儿眼中只不过意味着更多的工作机会和更多的钱。"
  舰身一阵异常剧烈的摇晃使厨房里的陶瓷器皿碰得哗啦啦直响。这场激烈的舌战停止了。维克多?亨利回到自己的船舱。在到达冰岛离舰之前,亨利再也没同那些英国军官过多地交谈。
  词汇(Vocabulary)
  pervade ( v.) :spread through,saturate or permeate every part of充满;弥漫
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  haze ( n.) :1ight thin mist or smoke薄雾;烟雾;尘雾
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  tint ( n.) :a color or a shading of a color,esp. a gradation of a color with reference to its mixture with white色彩;色泽(尤指色彩的浓淡)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  chore ( n.) :any daily or routine tasks(unpleasant,uninteresting or difficult);a daily necessary job,esp. in a house or on a farm(usu.pl.)日常零星工作,零星活儿(如家庭杂务,农场杂活等)(常用复数)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  squawk ( n.) :loud harsh sound粗厉的叫声
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  camouflage ( v.) :disguise(a thing or person)in order to conceal伪装(物或人);隐蔽;掩饰
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  swirl ( n.) : twist and curl旋转;转动;回旋
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  spangle ( v.) :cover or decorate with spangles or other bright objects用闪光的金属片等装饰
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  quarter-deck ( n.) :part of the highest level of a ship,used only by officers'(供军官使用的)船尾甲板
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  awning ( n.) :movable covering,esp. one made of canvas,used to protect shop windows,shipdecks,etc.from sun or rain(用于门、窗、甲板等)遮阳篷;遮雨篷;凉篷
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  august ( adj.) : causing feelings of great respect;noble and grand;venerable for reasons of age or high rank可敬的,可尊敬的;德高望重的;高贵的
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  squeal ( n.) :a high-pitched,shrill cry or sound,somewhat prolonged长而尖的叫声
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  boatswain ( n.) :a ship's officer or petty officer in charge of the deck crew,the rigging,anchors,boats,etc.水手长
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  beckon (v.) :make a silent sign,as with the finger,call(someone)(用招手)表示招呼;召唤(某人)
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  expedite ( v.) :perform quickly and efficiently迅速处理,速办
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  spick-and-span ( adj.) :(short for spick-and-span-new)neat and clean,very neat or smart and new(spick-and-span-new的缩写形式)极整洁的,极干净的;崭新的
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  pit ( v.) :mark with small scars使留下疤痕
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  aghast ( adj.) :feeling great horror or dismay;terrified;horrified惊愕的,惊骇的,惊吓的
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  scupper ( n.) :an opening in a ship's side to allow water to run off the deck船侧的排水孔
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  drove ( n.) :a moving crowd of people(行动的)人群
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  salvo ( n.) :simultaneous discharge of artillery or other firearms,esp. as salute,or in sea-fight(枪炮的)齐射(尤指礼炮的齐鸣,海战中的齐射)
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  quartermaster ( n.) :petty officer or mate who attends to the ship's compass,navigation,signals etc.(兼管信号等的)舵手;航信士官
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  escort ( v.) :.go with as an escort;accompany to protect or show honor or courtesy to护卫,护送;陪同,伴随
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  watertight (adj.) :so snugly put together that no water can get in or through不透水的;水密的;防水的
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  bunk ( n.) :a shelf like bed or berth built into or against a wall,as in a ship(船上的)铁架帆布床,(船上的)铺位
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  scrounge ( v. ) :[colloq.]manage to get or find by hunting around[口](四处)搜寻
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  purse ( v.) :draw(the lips)tightly together皱起;缩拢
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  aluminum ( n.) :one of the chemical elements,a silvery,lightweight,easily worked metal that resist corrosion and is found abundantly,but only in combination铝
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  swell ( n.) :a large wave that moves steadily without breaking波涛(汹涌)
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  coxswain ( n.) :a petty officer or other person in charge of a ship's boat and acting as its steersman(救生艇的)艇长;舵手,舵工
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  flop ( v.) :flap,strike,throw,or cause to drop noisily and clumsily猛烈地抛落;笨拙的落下
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  rickety ( adj. ) :liable to fall or break down because weak;shaky易倒的;易垮的;不结实的,不稳固的
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  strangle ( v.) :suffocate or choke in any manner窒息 ;闷住;使
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  shellacking ( n.) :[Am.slang]a thorough defeat[美俚]彻底击败
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  droop ( v.) :sink down;hang or bend down下沉;下垂;垂下;弯下
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  deference ( n.) :courteous regard or respects,honor敬意,尊敬,敬重
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  hobble ( v.) :cause to go haltingly or lamely使跛行
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  confer ( v.) :have a conference or talk;meet for discussion;converse商量,磋商;商讨,交换意见,进行讨论
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  jumble ( v.) :mix in a confused,disorderly heap混杂;使乱堆;使混合
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  foul ( v.) :entangle,disorder or confuse使纠缠;使混乱
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  materiel ( n.) :weapons,equipment,supplies of armed forces作战物资;武器弹药
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  arsenal ( n.) :a place for making or storing weapons and other munitions兵工厂;军械库
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  hypothetical ( adj.) :based on,involving,or having the nature of a hypothesis;assumed;supposed假设的,假定的
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  recur ( v. ) : occur again,as in talk or memory;come up again for consideration(往事等)再现,重现
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  stupendous (adj.) :astonishingly great or large极大的
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  larch ( n.) :any of a genus(Larix)of trees of the pine family,found throughout the N Hemisphere,bearing cones and needlelike leaves that are shed annually落叶松
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  fir ( n.) :any of a genus (Abies)of cone-bearing evergreen trees of the pine family. having flattened single needles and erect cones whose scales drop at maturity冷杉属树,冷杉
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  lurch ( n.) :stagger突然倾斜;蹒跚,摇晃
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  gangplank ( n.) :a narrow,movable platform or ramp forming a bridge by which to board or leave a ship上下船的跳板
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  hitch ( v.) :move,pull,or shift with jerks急拉,急推,猛地一动
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  chaplain ( n.) :a minister,priest,or rabbi serving in a religious capacity with army forces,or in prison,hospital,etc.(军队、监狱、医院等的)牧师,教士,神父
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  vestment ( n.) :any of the garments worn by officials and their assistants,choir members,etc.during certain services and rites祭袍;弥撒祭袍;法衣
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  unwonted (adj.) :not common,usual,or habitual;infrequent;rare不寻常的;罕见的;少有的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  den ( n.) :a small,cozy room where one can be alone to read.work,etc.私室;书斋;休憩室
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  sherry ( n.) :yellow or brown wine of southern Spain.South Africa,Cyprus,England雪利酒(西班牙及其他地方产的一种浅黄色或深褐色葡萄酒)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  commodore ( n.) :(U.S.Navy)an officer ranking above a captain and below a rear admiral(美国)海军准将
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  zigzag (v.) :move or form in a zigzag弯弯曲曲地行进
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  appal ( v.) :(=appall)fill with horror or dismay;shock使惊愕;惊吓;使惊骇,使震惊
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  scupper ( n.) :an opening in a ship's side to allow water to run off the deck船侧的排水孔
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  drove ( n.) :a moving crowd of people(行动的)人群
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  salvo ( n.) :simultaneous discharge of artillery or other firearms,esp. as salute,or in sea-fight(枪炮的)齐射(尤指礼炮的齐鸣,海战中的齐射)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  quartermaster ( n.) :petty officer or mate who attends to the ship's compass,navigation,signals etc.(兼管信号等的)舵手;航信士官
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  escort ( v.) :go with as an escort;accompany to protect or show honor or courtesy to护卫,护送;陪同,伴随
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  watertight ( adj. ) :so snugly put together that no water can get in or through不透水的;水密的;防水的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  bunk ( n.) :a shelf like bed or berth built into or against a wall,as in a ship(船上的)铁架帆布床,(船上的)铺位
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  scrounge ( v.) :[colloq.]manage to get or find by hunting around[口](四处)搜寻
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  purse ( v.) :draw(the lips)tightly together皱起;缩拢
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  aluminum ( n.) :one of the chemical elements,a silvery,lightweight,easily worked metal that resist corrosion and is found abundantly,but only in combination铝
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  swell ( n.) :a large wave that moves steadily without breaking波涛(汹涌)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  coxswain ( n.) :a petty officer or other person in charge of a ship's boat and acting as its steersman(救生艇的)艇长;舵手,舵工
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  flop ( v.) :flap,strike,throw,or cause to drop noisily and clumsily猛烈地抛落;笨拙的落下
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  rickety ( adj.) :liable to fall or break down because weak;shaky易倒的;易垮的;不结实的,不稳固的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  strangle (v.) :suffocate or choke in any manner窒息 ;闷住;使
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  shellacking ( n.) :[Am.slang]a thorough defeat[美俚]彻底击败
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  droop ( v.) :sink down;hang or bend down下沉;下垂;垂下;弯下
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  deference ( n.) :courteous regard or respects,honor敬意,尊敬,敬重
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  hobble ( v.) :cause to go haltingly or lamely使跛行
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  confer ( v.) :have a conference or talk;meet for discussion;converse商量,磋商;商讨,交换意见,进行讨论
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  jumble ( v.) :mix in a confused,disorderly heap混杂;使乱堆;使混合
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  foul (v.) :entangle,disorder or confuse使纠缠;使混乱
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  materiel ( n.) :weapons,equipment,supplies of armed forces作战物资;武器弹药
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  arsenal ( n.) :a place for making or storing weapons and other munitions兵工厂;军械库
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  hypothetical ( adj.) : based on,involving,or having the nature of a hypothesis;assumed;supposed假设的,假定的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  recur ( v.) :occur again,as in talk or memory;come up again for consideration(往事等)再现,重现
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  stupendous ( adj.) :astonishingly great or large极大的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  larch ( n.) :any of a genus(Larix)of trees of the pine family,found throughout the N Hemisphere,bearing cones and needlelike leaves that are shed annually落叶松
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  fir ( n.) :any of a genus (Abies)of cone-bearing evergreen trees of the pine family. having flattened single needles and erect cones whose scales drop at maturity冷杉属树,冷杉
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  lurch ( v.) :stagger突然倾斜;蹒跚,摇晃
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  gangplank ( n.) :a narrow,movable platform or ramp forming a bridge by which to board or leave a ship上下船的跳板
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  hitch ( v. ) :move,pull,or shift with jerks急拉,急推,猛地一动
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  chaplain ( n.) :a minister,priest,or rabbi serving in a religious capacity with army forces,or in prison,hospital,etc.(军队、监狱、医院等的)牧师,教士,神父
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  vestment ( n.) :any of the garments worn by officials and their assistants,choir members,etc.during certain services and rites祭袍;弥撒祭袍;法衣
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  unwonted ( adj.) :not common,usual,or habitual;infrequent;rare不寻常的;罕见的;少有的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  den ( n.) :a small,cozy room where one can be alone to read.work,etc.私室;书斋;休憩室
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  sherry ( n.) :yellow or brown wine of southern Spain.South Africa,Cyprus,England雪利酒(西班牙及其他地方产的一种浅黄色或深褐色葡萄酒)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  commodore ( n.) :(U.S.Navy)an officer ranking above a captain and below a rear admiral(美国)海军准将
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  zigzag ( v.) :move or form in a zigzag弯弯曲曲地行进
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  appal ( v.) :(=appall)fill with horror or dismay;shock使惊愕;惊吓;使惊骇,使震惊
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  gamut ( n.) :①[music]any complete musical scale,esp. the major scale;②the entire range or extent,as of emotions①[乐](全)音阶,(全)音域;②整个范围;全部
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  glum (adj.) :feeling or looking gloomy,sullen,or morose忧郁的,闷闷不乐的;愁眉不展的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  squint ( v.) :look or peer with the eyes partly closed,as when the light is too strong眯着眼看
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  inexorable ( adj.) :that cannot be move or influenced by persuasion or entreaty;unrelenting不退让的,不屈不挠的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  full-fledged ( adj.) :completely developed or trained成熟的;经过充分训练(或培养)的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  rubble ( n.) :debris from buildings,etc.,resulting from earthquake,bombing,etc.废石,瓦砾
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  embark ( v.) :go aboard a ship,airplane,etc.登船;登机
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  aide ( n.) :[Fre.]an officer in the army,navy,etc.serving as assistant and confidential secretary to a superior[法语](军队中)副官;侍从参谋;侍从武官
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ensign ( n.) :a U.S.Navy commissioned officer of the lowest rank,.ranking below a lieutenant junior grade(美国)海军少尉
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  chum ( n.) :close friends(among boys)(男性中)密友,好友
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  detach ( v.) :send(troops,ships,etc.)on a special mission分派,分遣,派遣(军队、船只等)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  smattering ( n.) :slight or superficial knowledge肤浅的知识
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  whew ( adj.) : whew or similar sounds roughly breathed out and used(often in joke)to express consternation,dismay,fatigue or surprise哎唷(表示惊讶,厌恶,恐惧等的感叹词)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  suicidal (adj.) : having an urge to commit suicide导致自杀的;自取灭亡的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  anthem ( n.) :a song of praise or devotion,as to a nation,college,etc.赞歌,颂歌;国歌;校歌
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  grandeur ( n.) :[Fre.]splendor;magnificence[法语]壮观;宏伟;庄严
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  springy ( adj.) :elastic,as if on springs,with plenty of bounce in the legs有弹性的,有弹力的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  adept ( adj.) :thoroghly proficient;expert of;adapt;adopt 熟练的;有技能的;精通的,内行的
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  rheumy ( adj.) :full of watery discharge from mucous membranes,as of the mouth,eyes,or nose多稀黏液的(如唾液、眼泪、鼻涕等)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  bespeak ( v.) :be indicative of;show表现出;显示,表示
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  equivocate ( v.) :use ambiguous terms in order to deceive,mislead,etc.;be deliberately ambiguous about躲闪,推诿,含糊其词,支吾,搪塞
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  dissolve ( v.) :break up;disunite;decompose;disintegrate分解;(使)分裂;(使)分离;(使)瓦解
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  hunch ( n.) :[colloq.]a feeling about something not based on known facts[口]预感;预兆;疑心
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  crochery ( n.) :earthen-ware,pots,jars,dishes陶瓷餐具
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  galley ( n.) :a ship's kitchen船上厨房
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  crossfire ( n.) :situation in which questions are put to sb.from all directions;firing of guns from two or more points so that the lines of fire cross(对立的力量、意见等)激烈的交锋;交叉火力,交叉射击
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  短语 (Expressions)
  take the floor:   get up to speak or address the audience起立发言或演讲
  例: I now invite the president to take the floor.现在请总统讲话。
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  be adept at:   be expert or skillful in对某事内行的,熟悉的
  例: She is adept at growing roses.她善于种花。
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  come to hand:   to be found without one's having to make a special search到手
  例: Your letter has just come to hand.刚收到你的信。
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  only to do:   used to indicate sth.that happens immediately after. wards,esp.sth.that causes surprise,disappointment,relief,etc.(用以指随即发生的事,尤指使人惊讶、失望、放心等的事)反而,却
  例: I arrived at the shop only to find I had left my money at home.我到商店却发现钱落在家里了。

 

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